Recovery journeys

Here you can read a collection of first-hand accounts from our service users about their own or their loved ones’ recovery journeys.
"I've been supported with every single aspect and area of my life. Because of my drinking and the way I lived my life I had no friends or family at all to help support me in my journey to recovery. Horizon have been family, friends and teachers to this point – and continue to be so.”
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
black and white close up of a man in his fifties with short white hair and dark glasses
Rod’s first contact with Addaction Scotland was six years ago when his alcohol addiction meant things had to change for him and his family. Fast-forward to the present day and he’s now a full-time Addaction project worker who’s determined to help others on the road to recovery.
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Photograph of a white woman in her early 50s with short white hair, looking at the camera. She had multiple piercings in both ears. There is a wooden door in the background
Doe Patrick is a dedicated volunteer and valued member of the team at Addaction North Somerset. But life has only looked this good for the past couple of years. Before Doe found Addaction, she was battling a 30 year long addiction, unaware recovery was available.
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Friends and family
“I got into trouble with alcohol after a breakdown and a divorce. I’d always been a drinker, aren’t most of us?"
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Photograph of a woman with her glasses on top of her head, pale blonde hair, smiling at the camera.
“Five years ago, I was living in an old camper van on a friend’s drive. I’d lost my two beautiful daughters (aged 12 and 20 at the time) and had my upmarket home repossessed. But every morning I would put my brave face on and head off to run my print and design company. Nobody at work suspected what was happening to me to start with, as I hid it very well."
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Photograph of a white man with short salt-and-pepper hair, wearing a black t-shirt and with a work lanyard around his neck stood in front of a door with the 'Rise' logo on it
Former soldier Phil Rogers left the army with PTSD and only after losing his partner, his home, becoming dependent on alcohol and cutting his wrists did he finally get the help and support he deserved. Phil now volunteers at RISE Recovery in Barnstaple because he doesn’t want to see other people go through the ‘hell’ he lived.
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Mental health
photograph of a white man in his 40s with slightly punky hair. He is wearing a white t-shirt and looking into the camera with his head cocked to one side
Kenny’s alcohol issues turned everything on its head - including his career and his relationship with his girlfriend of over 10 years. Now he’s come out the other side, he’s determined to make Addaction Glasgow work for other people in the way it worked for him.
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Picture of a young, white teenager leaning on a brick wall looking at the camera. In the background are two teenage girls
Andrew, who’s 17 and from South Yorkshire, has Asperger’s Syndrome and had been using a mixture of club drugs (mainly ecstasy and cocaine) since he was 14 to help him feel more outgoing and connected with others when he was out socially. A shock referral to Young Addaction led him to a better life.
Services: 
Young persons
James Glasgow
"I still live in the same flat, so people round there have seen me at my worst…but I don’t need to run away from that. I’ve become a positive influence in my community and I’m a visible presence of recovery."
Services: 
Adult drug and alcohol
Photograph of a middle-aged asian woman with bobbd shoulder-length hair and wearing a blue top. She is leaning on a railing and gazing out into the camera. Behind her is a bridge over a river.
Clare, 50, came to Thinkaction miapt Merton after finding out about the service from a local group she had started to attend, Focus for One. “I was definitely having a breakdown. I had lost my job, and the job centre was giving me nothing but hassle, which really made me anxious and stressed. Then I was also losing my home.” Clare wasn’t sure where to turn to, as she'd grown up in a family where “I was always taught that you do not divulge anything outside the house.”
Services: 
Mental health
Photograph of a dark haired white young man looking straight at the camera, looking despondent. Behind him are other young men but they are blurry and out of focus
Mental Health Awareness Week 2016 is all about ‘relationships’. When you’re growing up it’s important to be aware of your relationships with other people, from your parents to friends, teachers or colleagues. Sometimes it can be hard to leave friendship circles that don’t make you happy. Ryan’s local friends were affecting his well-being and attitude to life. Over time he began to recognise that by continuing to hang out with certain groups – which mainly involved drugs, alcohol and repeated offending – would mean a downward spiral for himself. He knew he had to distance himself, but this wasn’t easy as he lived among them and at the time they were his only friends.
Services: 
Friends and family
Young persons
Photograph of three young people sat around a kitchen table, deep in conversation.
Addaction's Mind and Body practitioners supports young people to develop their self-esteem and find better coping mechanisms than self-harm. Following a successful pilot in Canterbury, the programme is now being expanded across Kent and also rolled out in Cornwall and Lancashire. Emily was one of the participants in the initial Mind and Body pilot. Here she shares her experience in her own words.
Services: 
Mental health
Young persons

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